IB LEARNER PROFILE ATTRIBUTES & ATTITUDES

 

 

LEARNER PROFILES

 

 

The International Baccalaureate® (IB) learner profile describes a broad range of human capacities and responsibilities that go beyond academic success.

 

They imply a commitment to help all members of the school community learn to respect themselves, others and the world around them.

 

Each of the IB's programmes is committed to the development of students according to the IB learner profile.

 

The profile aims to develop learners who are:

  • Inquirers - They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

  • Knowledgeable - They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance.In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understandingacross a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

  • Thinkers - They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

  • Communicators - They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

  • Principled - They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

  • Open-minded - They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

  • Caring - They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

  • Risk-takers - They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

  • Balanced - They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

  • Reflective - They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development. 

IB ATTITUDES

 

        As the attributes of the IB learner profile are relevant to both students and adults in a PYP school, so too are the PYP attitudes. They need to be interpreted and modelled for students. The purpose of the modelling is not to encourage students to mimic but to provide support—a metacognitive framework—to help students reflect on and develop their own set of values, albeit in the context of that being demonstrated. The teacher should look for authentic demonstrations of these attitudes in the daily lives of the students in order to raise an awareness of, and build an appreciation for them. 

 

        The attitudes should not be part of a hidden curriculum but should be part of the vernacular of the PYP classroom, explicitly part of classroom discussions, and reflected in teachers’ anecdotal records. They should also be addressed explicitly within the taught and assessed components of the curriculum so that learning experiences and assessment strategies are designed to support and promote the attitudes.  

 

         The descriptions of the attitudes are to some degree a reflection of parts of the IB learner profile. Although this congruency is understandable, the attitudes should be considered as “habits of mind” that inform curriculum decisions made across all three components of the PYP curriculum model. Their impact will affect deeply the learning environment and the personal interactions that occur within it.